Tag Archives: NASA

Destination: Jupiter + The Year of the Rooster

February 2nd will mark one of NASA’s Juno space probe’s closest flybys to Jupiter.  We are celebrating by sharing what we’ve learned along the way since Juno first set out to Jupiter with a newly released episode in our original series Destination: Jupiter!  Then, travel to China during the peak of this year’s Chinese New Year celebrations with our newly curated content collection, China.  It’s a busy week for curious minds and we’ve got you covered with content spanning the globe and the Universe.

Destination: Jupiter

Seven months since the Juno spacecraft arrived at Jupiter on July 4th, 2016, the mission has started to lift the veil on the largest and most mysterious planet in our solar system.  Since its initial approach, the craft has been on a 53-day orbit around the gas giant.  Thus far, there have been three close flybys in August, October, and December of 2016.  During that time, Juno has flown a mere 2600 miles above the Jovian clouds, employing eight cutting-edge space exploration instruments to collect images and peer below the thick atmosphere of the planet, hoping to reveal its inner most secrets.

As the next flyby approaches on February 2nd, the Juno team will be tasked with making an unexpected and critical trajectory decision, impacting the future of the carefully-planned mission.  Review what has been uncovered so far in Mission Update, the second episode in our exclusive, original Destination: Jupiter series, and learn how you can become an active participant in the Juno Mission to Jupiter!

 

Chinese New Year

The most anticipated global event in China’s calendar is in full swing, when people take to the streets to ring in another year.  Unlike the festivities of many countries, which always take place at midnight between December 31 and January 1, Chinese New Year is a moveable festivity.  This year, the celebration began on January 27 (New Year’s Eve) and continue for around two weeks (ending on February 2) and the year will last until February 15, 2018.  This year is the “Year of the Rooster” – those born in 1945, 1957, 1969, 1981, 1993 and 2005 are known as Roosters.

To honor the occasion, we have created a new content collection, full of our most fascinating and informative documentaries about China.  The collection contains 11 programs and spans over 12 hours, guaranteeing that you can become an expert on all things China by the time this year’s New Year celebrations come to a close.

Find the collection in its entirety here.  Happy New Year!

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Mars: The Red Planet

If you have been following NASA’s Curiosity Mars Rover, then you know it has had quite an eventful couple of months!  It has recently discovered an odd-shaped iron meteorite that some likened to “an alien egg,” viewed spectacularly layered rock formations and, just last week, slabs of rock cross-hatched with shallow ridges were discovered that likely originated as cracks in drying mud.  This makes it a perfect time to explore our new collection, Mars: The Red Planet.

Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun and the second-smallest planet in the Solar System after Mercury.  Named after the Roman God of War, it is often referred to as the “Red Planet” because the iron oxide prevalent on its surface gives it a reddish appearance.  50 years of space exploration have brought us closer to understanding Mars, but is it as hospitable as many experts think?

This newly curated collection is made up of eight programs, totaling just over six hours of content all about Mars.  Perfect for all age ranges, the content covers everything from whether or not there is water on Mars to the likelihood of life on Mars to what it would take for humans to colonize Mars.

So, why not make it a night of star gazing and dreaming of far away galaxies?  Grab some popcorn and get ready to binge on facts and speculations about the Red Planet.  Find the full collection here, only on CuriosityStream.

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A Rendezvous With The King Of Planets

NASA’s Juno orbiter is speeding toward Jupiter with a flyby expected on July 4th.  Leading up to that rendezvous, CuriosityStream is giving viewers an exclusive, behind-the-scenes look into the story behind the mission to the gas giant.  Destination: Jupiter is a new, short-form documentary available now on CuriosityStream, in ultra HD 4K, as well as HD and standard definition.

The Juno Mission is one of the most highly anticipated planetary explorations to date.  Scientists hope it will help reveal the mysteries of Jupiter’s violent storms, its composition and formation, as well as uncover some secrets about our own planet Earth.

Destination: Jupiter chronicles the inside story behind the ground-breaking mission, featuring interviews with its chief scientists, as well as captivating CGI produced by NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio.  Also, get a sneak peek at some of the state-of-the-art technology on board the spacecraft that will help it power through and survive Jupiter’s severe high-radiation environment—the harshest in the solar system.



 

And stay tuned in with CuriosityStream.  On July 4th, Juno is expected to officially catch up to Jupiter and enter its orbit.  Mission scientists will be anxiously awaiting the first signal of success… a communication that will take 48 minutes to travel back to Earth.  And in the coming days, CuriosityStream and Destination: Jupiter will bring you the nail-biting action from mission control at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

If we’ve peaked your curiosity about other destinations in our solar system and you’re ready to dive deep into the mysteries of the galaxy, you’ll enjoy CuriosityStream’s Destination: Pluto, an original, 13-part series following the New Horizons mission from its inception to its close encounter with the dwarf planet, as well as Destination: Mars, a 5-part series chronicling a bold plan to land humans on the red planet.

Enjoy the adventure, and stay curious!

 

 

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A Rocket Man back on Earth

NASA has a lot to celebrate this week.   First, a birthday of sorts. On March 3rd, 1915, the United States Government created the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics… an agency to spearhead aeronautical research.  Over 40 years later, in 1958, that agency officially became NASA.

And today, one of NASA’s most well known ambassadors is back on Earth.  Astronaut Scott Kelly returned this week from his nearly year-long post on the International Space Station… making him the U.S. astronaut holding the record for both consecutive days in space (340) as well as total number of days (520.)

His journey was well documented on social media.  With the hashtag #YearInSpace, Kelly regularly posted pictures of his extraordinary view – from stunning sunrises to the ultimate aerial shot of an epic snowstorm.

Kelly’s mission was part of a groundbreaking study on the long term physical and psychological effects of living in outer space, in anticipation of NASA’s goal to send a manned mission to Mars by 2035.  That roundtrip journey would take more than 2 years.  While in space, Kelly self-administered a battery of tests. The results of those, and of the testing now being done back on Earth, are being compared to the same tests run on his twin brother, retired astronaut Mark Kelly.

Scott Kelly is a true Rocket Man, like many of the pioneers who came before him, who left this Earth to explore the unknown.  Their inspirational stories are told in Rocket Men, featured on CuriosityStream now.  Here’s a preview.

 

And, congratulations to modern day Rocket Man Scott Kelly, for a successful mission and his safe return home.

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Remembering the Challenger

“The future doesn’t belong to the fainthearted.”   –President Ronald Reagan

It’s one of those few moments in history that is burned into the memories of most people alive at the time.  30 years ago on a clear but cold Florida morning, the Space Shuttle Challenger lifted off with 6 NASA astronauts and one special crew member on board. The shuttle missions were fascinating on their own, but this mission carried Christa McAuliffe, a high school teacher from New Hampshire, who had become all our teacher.

As people paused their days and watched on television screens around the world, including school children from all over the country, millions witnessed what is still today one of the worst tragedies of the American Space Program.



 

The nation was stunned and horrified.  That day in January was also scheduled to be the President’s State of the Union address.  For the only time in modern history, the speech was cancelled.  Instead, then President Ronald Reagan spoke to a grieving nation, and closed his remarks with powerful words that will live on forever:

“The crew of the space shuttle Challenger honored us by the manner in which they lived their lives.  We will never forget them, nor the last time we saw them, this morning, as they prepared for their journey and waved goodbye and ‘slipped the surly bonds of earth’ to ‘touch the face of God.’”

The President’s speech also issued a clear message to NASA, to the country, and to the world.  We would continue the important journey of space exploration.  There would be more shuttle flights, more missions, and indeed, there were.

The Space Shuttle fleet helped to broaden humankind’s exploration of space for three decades.  Cosmic Front: Space Shuttle on CuriosityStream has the dramatic story of all the triumphs and tragedies until the fleet’s final flight in 2011.

The U.S. Space Program is in a new phase, working to stay on the leading edge of scientific discovery.  CuriosityStream offers a substantial selection of programming about the past, present and future of space exploration.  Check out Curiosity Studios’ original documentary Mars: The Journey for an in depth look at efforts to land humans on the red planet.  And watch our original 13-part series Destination: Pluto about the New Horizons mission to explore the dwarf planet and the outer edges of deep space.

And as we look forward, we will always remember that clear but cold morning in Florida.

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Moon Man… Or Woman?

What do you get when you lock 6 female, Russian cosmonauts in a mock spaceship for over a week? The answer: an experiment further drawing attention to Russia’s growing interesting a lunar landing. The Russian Federal Space Agency announced that a mission to the moon is planned for 2029. And as part of that effort, a crew of 6 Russian women just emerged from an 8-day mock spaceflight, the first test of its kind featuring an all-female crew. Each of the six volunteer scientists has a background in medicine or biophysics. They performed over 30 experiments during the simulated flight, and dealt with curveballs including bad weather simulations that delayed their “re-entry” by a day. Russia is taking a page from its own history books. The first woman in space was from the Soviet Union. Cosmonaut Valentina Tereshlova spent almost 3 days in orbit in 1963, at the height of the US-Soviet space race.

Of course, the Unites States put the first humans on the moon. July 1969, Neil Armstrong stepped onto the lunar surface as the dramatic moment beamed live around the world. The mission is still referred to as one of mankind’s greatest technological achievements.

The Smithsonian’s Dr. Roger Launius, formerly NASA’s chief historian, paints a picture of Apollo 11’s extraordinary crew, and tells the story behind those famous words etched in the history books.

For the complete history behind all of NASA’s Moon Missions, from Apollo 1 to Apollo 17, search for Moonshots on CuriosityStream . For the first time, see the dramatic events in 4K and HD original footage taken by the astronauts during the most iconic space voyages in history.

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Mars: The Next Frontier?

NASA grabbed a lot of headlines this week with its message of a “Mars Mystery Solved!”

Social media started buzzing with guesses on the announcement, ranging from implications of water on Mars, to actual life on the red planet. Indeed, when NASA made all the excitement official, it unveiled definitive signs of liquid, flowing water on our closest planetary neighbor.

CuriosityStream advisory board member and SETI Institute co-founder Dr. Jill Tarter shared her thoughts on NASA’s revelation and the implications for her work at the forefront of the search for extraterrestrial life:

“Liquid water on Mars – now!  That’s just one more way that the universe appears to be bio-friendly.  But determining whether this habitable real estate is actually inhabited will be a tough job, and one that demands a lot of care.  As John Rummel (the SETI Institute’s own Planetary Protection guru) reminds us, we could potentially do a lot of harm by introducing terrestrial organisms into environments on Mars where they could grow and reproduce.

Dr. Tarter continued, “Ultimately humans may wish to live on the red planet, which won’t be so red after terraforming, but first we need to know if anything else is living there. If there is life, and it isn’t related to us, then this second genesis in our one small solar system guarantees that we will find life beyond Earth in great abundance.  Whether any of that life is intelligent and technological is an obvious next question; the question that SETI works to answer.”

You can dive deep into all these questions on CuriosityStream, which is premiering four new programs focused on the scientific, historical and emotional perspectives of exploring and potentially living on Mars.

MARS: THE JOURNEY is an original mini-documentary about mankind’s enduring quest to explore Mars, featuring experts from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.  A series of recent robotic missions is providing clues that could pave the way for manned exploration that could one day make Mars our home.

DESTINATION MARS is a 5-part original series investigating the perils and promise of a manned mission to Mars. A mix of documentary sequences, expert interviews and dramatic reconstructions explore in detail the plans of the Netherlands-based group Mars One – and efforts underway by NASA and private companies to reach the red planet.  Here’s a sneak peak:



 

Also:

A CURIOUS WORLD: CAN WE COLONIZE MARS? is a short-form original that explores the realities of living on the red planet. Multiple public and private ventures are making real progress toward a goal that once seemed unimaginable:  establishing a human settlement on Mars. But what will it take to get there?  Will humans ultimately be able to survive on Mars?

COSMIC FRONT: TERRAFORMING MARS is a one-hour special that explores how a seemingly dead world like the red planet could be transformed into an Eden of flowing rivers and towering forests in less than a century. Astrobiologist Chris McKay has a bold plan to seed life, warm the atmosphere and trigger cascading events that could create a second earth teeming with life.

Start right here to begin your own mission of curiosity!

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Celebrating the Pluto Flyby!

A team from CuriosityStream witnessed the historic moment of the Pluto Flyby!

“The Pluto mission is a human endeavor” said Alan Stern, as the crowd at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory patiently awaited the highly anticipated flyby of New Horizons by Pluto on the morning of July 14th, 2015 just minutes before 8:00am.

The big lit screens gave the count, five minutes away and everybody was standing by; American flags in hand, we saw media, scientists, mission team members and international visitors come together for Pluto’s final reveal and well deserved comeback. Bill Nye, the Science Guy, joined the enthusiastic group to the side of the stage, as the buzz starting growing. Multiple electronic devices on hand, cameramen filming on their mobiles and video equipment simultaneously, and a man three seats down surprised that the picture he sent had just reached the other side of the world “I just sent this to Australia!” he exclaimed looking at his screen. There was even a replica of the New Horizons probe turned into a hat that was passed around among some lucky heads.

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Before we could even realize it, the countdown had started. Nervous eyes scanned the room looking for a sense of understanding of what was about to take place. Alan Stern and New Horizons team members encouraged everybody to join in — “Make sure they can hear us all over the world!”. A countdown like no other; actually, one of the best countdowns you could ever witness. Far beyond the hype of New Year’s and watching fireworks in the sky, this was it: a once in a lifetime event, for all the talented individuals from the New Horizons, NASA, and JPL teams, that took nine years of continuous monitoring and a very long waiting period.

And so it went, from 10 down to the last second, the hundreds of people gathered for the early morning event loudly raised their voices as they experienced history in the making. This time, there were no pictures, no live transmission on screen, no man floating down the iconic stairs or a spacecraft roughly landing on a red planet. As invisible and low key as the Pluto flyby was, it was also a collective mind-blowing understanding of how far we have come – the final frontier of our solar system has now been explored. And as a lonely probe continues to fly into the unknown beyond Pluto and onto the Kuiper Belt, we are certain that we can now welcome a new chapter of space exploration and the next set of discoveries — lead, as always, by the curious ones.

Laura Santana

Marketing and Production

Relive the excitement of July 14th, 2015!

 

 

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Destination: Pluto

The New Horizons mission launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida on January 19, 2006.  Since then, NASA’s space probe has traveled a million miles a day for nearly 10 years to reach its destination, Pluto!  It will gather its closest images on July 14, 2015 — the 50th Anniversary of the Mariner 4’s flyby of Mars.  However, this mission will collect 5,000 times more data than the Mariner 4!

Five episodes about the New Horizons mission are now available on CuriosityStream.com and include expert interviews with principal investigator, Alan Stern.  Watch Destination: Pluto, and dive deep into the #PlutoFlyby!

Best,

Elizabeth Hendricks North

President | CuriosityStream

 

 

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