Tag Archives: Mars

Mars: The Red Planet

If you have been following NASA’s Curiosity Mars Rover, then you know it has had quite an eventful couple of months!  It has recently discovered an odd-shaped iron meteorite that some likened to “an alien egg,” viewed spectacularly layered rock formations and, just last week, slabs of rock cross-hatched with shallow ridges were discovered that likely originated as cracks in drying mud.  This makes it a perfect time to explore our new collection, Mars: The Red Planet.

Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun and the second-smallest planet in the Solar System after Mercury.  Named after the Roman God of War, it is often referred to as the “Red Planet” because the iron oxide prevalent on its surface gives it a reddish appearance.  50 years of space exploration have brought us closer to understanding Mars, but is it as hospitable as many experts think?

This newly curated collection is made up of eight programs, totaling just over six hours of content all about Mars.  Perfect for all age ranges, the content covers everything from whether or not there is water on Mars to the likelihood of life on Mars to what it would take for humans to colonize Mars.

So, why not make it a night of star gazing and dreaming of far away galaxies?  Grab some popcorn and get ready to binge on facts and speculations about the Red Planet.  Find the full collection here, only on CuriosityStream.

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A Rendezvous With The King Of Planets

NASA’s Juno orbiter is speeding toward Jupiter with a flyby expected on July 4th.  Leading up to that rendezvous, CuriosityStream is giving viewers an exclusive, behind-the-scenes look into the story behind the mission to the gas giant.  Destination: Jupiter is a new, short-form documentary available now on CuriosityStream, in ultra HD 4K, as well as HD and standard definition.

The Juno Mission is one of the most highly anticipated planetary explorations to date.  Scientists hope it will help reveal the mysteries of Jupiter’s violent storms, its composition and formation, as well as uncover some secrets about our own planet Earth.

Destination: Jupiter chronicles the inside story behind the ground-breaking mission, featuring interviews with its chief scientists, as well as captivating CGI produced by NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio.  Also, get a sneak peek at some of the state-of-the-art technology on board the spacecraft that will help it power through and survive Jupiter’s severe high-radiation environment—the harshest in the solar system.



 

And stay tuned in with CuriosityStream.  On July 4th, Juno is expected to officially catch up to Jupiter and enter its orbit.  Mission scientists will be anxiously awaiting the first signal of success… a communication that will take 48 minutes to travel back to Earth.  And in the coming days, CuriosityStream and Destination: Jupiter will bring you the nail-biting action from mission control at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

If we’ve peaked your curiosity about other destinations in our solar system and you’re ready to dive deep into the mysteries of the galaxy, you’ll enjoy CuriosityStream’s Destination: Pluto, an original, 13-part series following the New Horizons mission from its inception to its close encounter with the dwarf planet, as well as Destination: Mars, a 5-part series chronicling a bold plan to land humans on the red planet.

Enjoy the adventure, and stay curious!

 

 

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A Rocket Man back on Earth

NASA has a lot to celebrate this week.   First, a birthday of sorts. On March 3rd, 1915, the United States Government created the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics… an agency to spearhead aeronautical research.  Over 40 years later, in 1958, that agency officially became NASA.

And today, one of NASA’s most well known ambassadors is back on Earth.  Astronaut Scott Kelly returned this week from his nearly year-long post on the International Space Station… making him the U.S. astronaut holding the record for both consecutive days in space (340) as well as total number of days (520.)

His journey was well documented on social media.  With the hashtag #YearInSpace, Kelly regularly posted pictures of his extraordinary view – from stunning sunrises to the ultimate aerial shot of an epic snowstorm.

Kelly’s mission was part of a groundbreaking study on the long term physical and psychological effects of living in outer space, in anticipation of NASA’s goal to send a manned mission to Mars by 2035.  That roundtrip journey would take more than 2 years.  While in space, Kelly self-administered a battery of tests. The results of those, and of the testing now being done back on Earth, are being compared to the same tests run on his twin brother, retired astronaut Mark Kelly.

Scott Kelly is a true Rocket Man, like many of the pioneers who came before him, who left this Earth to explore the unknown.  Their inspirational stories are told in Rocket Men, featured on CuriosityStream now.  Here’s a preview.

 

And, congratulations to modern day Rocket Man Scott Kelly, for a successful mission and his safe return home.

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Mars: The Next Frontier?

NASA grabbed a lot of headlines this week with its message of a “Mars Mystery Solved!”

Social media started buzzing with guesses on the announcement, ranging from implications of water on Mars, to actual life on the red planet. Indeed, when NASA made all the excitement official, it unveiled definitive signs of liquid, flowing water on our closest planetary neighbor.

CuriosityStream advisory board member and SETI Institute co-founder Dr. Jill Tarter shared her thoughts on NASA’s revelation and the implications for her work at the forefront of the search for extraterrestrial life:

“Liquid water on Mars – now!  That’s just one more way that the universe appears to be bio-friendly.  But determining whether this habitable real estate is actually inhabited will be a tough job, and one that demands a lot of care.  As John Rummel (the SETI Institute’s own Planetary Protection guru) reminds us, we could potentially do a lot of harm by introducing terrestrial organisms into environments on Mars where they could grow and reproduce.

Dr. Tarter continued, “Ultimately humans may wish to live on the red planet, which won’t be so red after terraforming, but first we need to know if anything else is living there. If there is life, and it isn’t related to us, then this second genesis in our one small solar system guarantees that we will find life beyond Earth in great abundance.  Whether any of that life is intelligent and technological is an obvious next question; the question that SETI works to answer.”

You can dive deep into all these questions on CuriosityStream, which is premiering four new programs focused on the scientific, historical and emotional perspectives of exploring and potentially living on Mars.

MARS: THE JOURNEY is an original mini-documentary about mankind’s enduring quest to explore Mars, featuring experts from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.  A series of recent robotic missions is providing clues that could pave the way for manned exploration that could one day make Mars our home.

DESTINATION MARS is a 5-part original series investigating the perils and promise of a manned mission to Mars. A mix of documentary sequences, expert interviews and dramatic reconstructions explore in detail the plans of the Netherlands-based group Mars One – and efforts underway by NASA and private companies to reach the red planet.  Here’s a sneak peak:



 

Also:

A CURIOUS WORLD: CAN WE COLONIZE MARS? is a short-form original that explores the realities of living on the red planet. Multiple public and private ventures are making real progress toward a goal that once seemed unimaginable:  establishing a human settlement on Mars. But what will it take to get there?  Will humans ultimately be able to survive on Mars?

COSMIC FRONT: TERRAFORMING MARS is a one-hour special that explores how a seemingly dead world like the red planet could be transformed into an Eden of flowing rivers and towering forests in less than a century. Astrobiologist Chris McKay has a bold plan to seed life, warm the atmosphere and trigger cascading events that could create a second earth teeming with life.

Start right here to begin your own mission of curiosity!

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